A simple, accessible process that connects us to the world of sound.

Life Echo is a personal sound map created from memories. Instead of navigating a physical place it helps those with limited capacity for memory navigate the different events they have experienced, in a way that may have been. For many people, enjoying memories is a simple action that requires little effort. For some, it is a complex task that leads to frustration, fear, and a feeling of helplessness.

To illustrate, imagine you are given the task of compiling a biography. It could be yours, or perhaps a family member, or patient’s. But instead of detailed notes and dates to work from, you simply have vague, scribbled notes on scraps of paper. No dates. Few details. Life Echo is a creative, research project that uses sound to try aid recollection. The process can help collate these notes into something more concrete: a cohesive collection of memories, prompted by sound.

Originally created as an art and installation project inspired by an event in the artist’s life, Life Echo was developed into a rewarding investigation on the relationship between sound and memory. With over 1000 successful interactions with Life Echo now recorded, we have an idea of the possibilities and implications of this research.

The project has already been used in the following:

  • UK Fire Service
  • Hospitals and Hospices
  • SIFA, and Crisis Management
  • Educational Settings
  • Art Installations

As well as obvious enjoyment during the process of collecting and discussing their memories, those involved with Life Echo – patients, families and professionals – have reported numerous benefits of the experience. Many have been eager to engage in the project again.

Data collection is done collaboratively, through our uniquely designed map. The three steps currently taken during the Life Echo Process are Collection, Conversion, and Preservation, with the participants being full involved and engaged during that process. Using sound, and targeted questions, Life Echo members are able to begin investigating their relationship with sound, and we are able to delve deeper into the realm of sound and memory.